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Hollinshead Water-wise Garden Plants

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Taxon ID#

77

Soft, green-needled dwarf variety of Pinus strobus

Scientific  Name:

Pinus strobus 'Blue Shag'

Common Name 1

› Blue Shag Eastern White Pine

Family:

Pinaceae

Origins:

Southern Canada from Manitoba to Newfoundland, throughout the northern and eastern states from Minnesota and northern Iowa to the Atlantic coast, and southward along the Appalachian mountains to northern Georgia and Alabama

Plant Type:

Med - Lg Shrub (usually >3' and never < 1.5')
Common Name 2

Common Name 3

Oregon native:

no

Western state native:

no

Scroll down for more information on each topic

Landscape Application Information

Seasonal Care

Resource Links

MAINTENANCE

Maintenance Level:

Low

Min. USDA Hardiness Zone:

3

Sun Preference:

Partial Sun

Water Preference:

M

Soil Preference:

Prefers fertile, acidic, medium moisture, well-drained soil; Intolerant of compacted, clayey soils, alkaline conditions

Fertilizer Needs:

Recommended Mulch:

PLANT DESCRIPTION

Foliage Color:

Green

Foliage Description:

Short, blue green needles in bundles of 5 are soft to the touch

Fragrant:

no

Predominant flower color:

No Flower

Flower Description:

Fall color:

yes

Fall Color Description:

Green foliage

Winter Foliage:

Evergreen

Winter Interest:

yes

Winter Interest Description:

Green foliage

Mature height:

2-4'

Mature spread:

2-4'

Growth rate:

Slow

LANDSCAPE APPLICATION

Deer Resistant:

no

Fire Resistant:

no

Attracts Pollinators:

no

Attracts Butterflies:

no

Native Habitat:

Attracts Birds:

no

Cut/Dried Flowers:

no

Used by Wildlife:

yes

Swales:

no

Wildlife Use:

Photo:

Hedge/Screen:

yes

Border:

yes

Erosion Control:

no

Windbreak:

no

Ground Cover:

no

Provides Shade:

no

Rock Garden:

yes

Cover Structures:

no

First Bloom:

Last Bloom:

Adds Texture/Movement:

Ornamental Accent:

yes

yes

Garden Observations:

Seasonal Care
Maintenance

SEASONAL CARE

Spring Care:

Avoid pruning while pitch moths are active. Best to prune Oct - Feb.

Summer Care:

The candles can be pinched off or trimmed by 1/3 to 2/3 to limit the tree's yearly growth. Trimming the candles will encourage a�denser growth, since by the end of that�growing season, new terminal buds will have formed at the cut ends. �Next year?s grow

Fall Care:

Avoid pruning while pitch moths are active. Best to prune Oct - Feb.

Winter Care:

Pruning a tree during dormant season (e.g., late winter/early spring) will help the tree focus on strong shoots that grow rapidly - especially on the most severely pruned limbs. If you trim last year?s growth in February/March (which would likely include

Long Term Care:

Most conifers require little pruning. They are generally pruned for shape or to remove unwanted branches. It is important to distinguish between pruning tree branches and pruning or trimming candles. Avoid pruning while pitch moths are active. Best to p

Insect Pests:

White pine beetle

Wildlife Pests:

Tolerates deer and rabbit

Diseases:

White pine blister rust could be a problem.

Environmental Problems:

Intolerant of air pollutants such as sulfur dioxide and ozone.

Landscape Problems:

Species of Ribes (e.g., currants and gooseberries) are the alternate host for white pine blister rust and should not be planted in areas where white pines are under attack.

Care Comments:

Prefers cool, humid climates. When pruning pines, make cuts just above the needle whorls. Most new lateral growth is stimulated at these points, rather than along the stems between the whorls.

Landscape Application
Resource Links

Plant Maintenance Information

Image by Mikaela Wiedenhoff

Sponsors
Desert Peaks Healthcare
George & Vickie Minor
Whistle Stop Farm & Flowers

McPheeter's Turf
High Desert Farms Nursery Sales, LLC
Schilling's Garden Market

Speakers
Karen McCarthy, Madras Garden Depot
Dan Denning, City of Bend
Nicole Bell, OSU Ecology Lab

Professor Amy Jo Detweiler
Craig LeHoullier
Amanda Egertson, Deschutes Land Trust
Dana Sanchez, OSU
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Renee's Garden Seeds
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