top of page

Hollinshead Water-wise Garden Plants

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Taxon ID#

75

Irregular, dense growth habit. Very slow growing. The branches produce "bottlebrush" type needles covered with resin dots. One of the smaller evergreens for a landscape. Shrubby in youth

Scientific  Name:

Pinus aristata

Common Name 1

› Bristlecone pine

Family:

Pinaceae

Origins:

Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico

Plant Type:

Tree, Conifer
Common Name 2

› Rocky Mountain Bristlecone Pine

Common Name 3

› Colorado Bristlecone Pine

Oregon native:

no

Western state native:

no

Scroll down for more information on each topic

Landscape Application Information

Seasonal Care

Resource Links

MAINTENANCE

Maintenance Level:

Low

Min. USDA Hardiness Zone:

4

Sun Preference:

Partial Sun

Water Preference:

L

Soil Preference:

Poor dry rocky soils, alkaline or acid

Fertilizer Needs:

Low

Recommended Mulch:

Organic, Native

PLANT DESCRIPTION

Foliage Color:

Green

Foliage Description:

Bottlebrush type needles covered with resin dots, 5 needles per bundle

Fragrant:

no

Predominant flower color:

No Flower

Flower Description:

Fall color:

yes

Fall Color Description:

Green foliage

Winter Foliage:

Evergreen

Winter Interest:

yes

Winter Interest Description:

Foliage

Mature height:

10-30'

Mature spread:

15-20'

Growth rate:

Slow

LANDSCAPE APPLICATION

Deer Resistant:

yes

Fire Resistant:

no

Attracts Pollinators:

no

Attracts Butterflies:

no

Native Habitat:

Mountains of Colorado, New Mexico and Arizona (the San Francisco Peaks) at elevations of about 7,500 ft (2300 m) to 12,000 ft

Attracts Birds:

yes

Cut/Dried Flowers:

no

Used by Wildlife:

yes

Swales:

no

Wildlife Use:

Rodents consume large amount of seeds

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Hedge/Screen:

no

Border:

no

Erosion Control:

yes

Windbreak:

no

Ground Cover:

no

Provides Shade:

yes

Rock Garden:

yes

Cover Structures:

no

First Bloom:

Last Bloom:

Adds Texture/Movement:

Ornamental Accent:

yes

yes

Garden Observations:

Seasonal Care
Maintenance

SEASONAL CARE

Spring Care:

Avoid pruning while pitch moths are active. Best to prune Oct - Feb.

Summer Care:

The candles can be pinched off or trimmed by 1/3 to 2/3 to limit the tree's yearly growth. Trimming the candles will encourage a�denser growth, since by the end of that�growing season, new terminal buds will have formed at the cut ends. �Next year?s grow

Fall Care:

Avoid pruning while pitch moths are active. Best to prune Oct - Feb.

Winter Care:

Pruning a tree during dormant season (e.g., late winter/early spring) will help the tree focus on strong shoots that grow rapidly - especially on the most severely pruned limbs. If you trim last year?s growth in February/March (which would likely include

Long Term Care:

Most conifers require little pruning. They are generally pruned for shape or to remove unwanted branches. It is important to distinguish between pruning tree branches and pruning or trimming candles. Avoid pruning while pitch moths are active. Best to p

Insect Pests:

Susceptible to scale

Wildlife Pests:

Diseases:

White pine blister rust

Environmental Problems:

Landscape Problems:

Care Comments:

When pruning pines, make cuts just above the needle whorls. Most new lateral growth is stimulated at these points, rather than along the stems between the whorls.

Landscape Application
Resource Links

Plant Maintenance Information

Image by Mikaela Wiedenhoff

Sponsors
Desert Peaks Healthcare
George & Vickie Minor
Whistle Stop Farm & Flowers

McPheeter's Turf
High Desert Farms Nursery Sales, LLC
Schilling's Garden Market

Speakers
Karen McCarthy, Madras Garden Depot
Dan Denning, City of Bend
Nicole Bell, OSU Ecology Lab

Professor Amy Jo Detweiler
Craig LeHoullier
Amanda Egertson, Deschutes Land Trust
Dana Sanchez, OSU
PayPal ButtonPayPal Button
Renee's Garden Seeds
Contact the webmaster:
webmaster@gocomga.com
bottom of page