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Hollinshead Water-wise Garden Plants

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Taxon ID#

98

This hardy shrub has beautiful foliage that offers a slight red edge when new, then turns a deep red in fall. Does not flower or fruit at a young age and only lightly thereafter.

Scientific  Name:

Viburnum opulus 'americanum compactum''

Common Name 1

› Compact American Cranberry Bush

Family:

Adoxaceae

Origins:

This compact form of American cranberry bush was discovered by Pat Perkins at Bailey Nurseries. Formerly called Compact American cranberry bush.

Plant Type:

Med - Lg Shrub (usually >3' and never < 1.5')
Common Name 2

› Dwarf American Cranberry Viburnum

Common Name 3

› American cranberrybush

Oregon native:

no

Western state native:

no

Scroll down for more information on each topic

Landscape Application Information

Seasonal Care

Resource Links

MAINTENANCE

Maintenance Level:

Low

Min. USDA Hardiness Zone:

2

Sun Preference:

Partial Sun

Water Preference:

M

Soil Preference:

best in good, well-drained, moist soil. Prefers loams with consistent moisture, but tolerates a wide range of soils.

Fertilizer Needs:

Recommended Mulch:

PLANT DESCRIPTION

Foliage Color:

Green

Foliage Description:

Leaves simple, opposite, 3-lobed, 5-14 cm long, lobes acuminate, sometimes middle lobe elongated, dark green above; reddish tinge when new

Fragrant:

no

Predominant flower color:

White

Flower Description:

Flowers white, in 10 cm flat-topped clusters (cymes).

Fall color:

yes

Fall Color Description:

Deep red leaves and fruits

Winter Foliage:

Deciduous

Winter Interest:

no

Winter Interest Description:

Mature height:

5-6'

Mature spread:

5-6'

Growth rate:

LANDSCAPE APPLICATION

Deer Resistant:

no

Fire Resistant:

no

Attracts Pollinators:

yes

Attracts Butterflies:

yes

Native Habitat:

Viburnum opulus synonymous with and formerly known as Viburnum trilobum, is native to swampy woods, bogs, lake margins, pastures, thickets, slopes and moist low places from New Brunswick to British Columbia south to New York, the Great Lakes, South Dakot

Attracts Birds:

yes

Cut/Dried Flowers:

no

Used by Wildlife:

no

Swales:

yes

Wildlife Use:

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Hedge/Screen:

yes

Border:

yes

Erosion Control:

no

Windbreak:

no

Ground Cover:

no

Provides Shade:

no

Rock Garden:

no

Cover Structures:

no

First Bloom:

May

Last Bloom:

Adds Texture/Movement:

May

Ornamental Accent:

no

no

Garden Observations:

Seasonal Care
Maintenance

SEASONAL CARE

Spring Care:

Prune just before the buds swell in late winter or early spring, or wait to prune it immediately after flowering. Do not prune more than one-third of the bush at this time. You can prune more branches the next year

Summer Care:

Fall Care:

Winter Care:

Prune just before the buds swell in late winter or early spring, or wait to prune it immediately after flowering. Do not prune more than one-third of the bush at this time. You can prune more branches the next year.

Long Term Care:

Examine the shrub to gauge whether or not if it is overgrown and to look for the oldest, most unproductive canes. Prune them back flush to base of the shrub. Make sharp, clean cuts rather than tearing the wood. Now there is room for new, productive branch

Insect Pests:

Watch for aphids. Viburnum crown borer can cause stem dieback.

Wildlife Pests:

Diseases:

Some susceptibility to bacterial leaf spot, stem blight and powdery mildew. https://pnwhandbooks.org/plantdisease/host-and-disease-descriptions?title=Viburnu

Environmental Problems:

Landscape Problems:

No serious insect or disease problems. Watch for aphids. Viburnum crown borer can cause stem dieback. Some susceptibility to bacterial leaf spot, stem blight and powdery mildew.

Care Comments:

Landscape Application
Resource Links

Plant Maintenance Information

Image by Mikaela Wiedenhoff

Sponsors
Desert Peaks Healthcare
George & Vickie Minor
Whistle Stop Farm & Flowers

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Speakers
Karen McCarthy, Madras Garden Depot
Dan Denning, City of Bend
Nicole Bell, OSU Ecology Lab

Professor Amy Jo Detweiler
Craig LeHoullier
Amanda Egertson, Deschutes Land Trust
Dana Sanchez, OSU
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