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Hollinshead Water-wise Garden Plants

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Taxon ID#

104

Scientific  Name:

Spiraea douglasii

Common Name 1

› Douglas's Spirea

Family:

Rosaceae

Origins:

Rose spirea occurs naturally from southern
Alaska south to northern California and east to western
Montana. The elevation range is sea-level to 6,500 ft in
the mountains.

Plant Type:

Med - Lg Shrub (usually >3' and never < 1.5')
Common Name 2

› rose spirea

Common Name 3

› Western Spiraea

Oregon native:

yes

Western state native:

yes

Scroll down for more information on each topic

Landscape Application Information

Seasonal Care

Resource Links

MAINTENANCE

Maintenance Level:

Low

Min. USDA Hardiness Zone:

4

Sun Preference:

Partial Sun

Water Preference:

M

Soil Preference:

Prefers sandy or loamy soils. Does not grow well in clay soils.. Soil PH: 5 - 7

Fertilizer Needs:

Recommended Mulch:

PLANT DESCRIPTION

Foliage Color:

Green

Foliage Description:

Oval green leaves (to 4" long) are felty white-tomentose beneath.

Fragrant:

yes

Predominant flower color:

Pink

Flower Description:

Tiny, fragrant reddish
pink flowers are borne in dense, elongate clusters at the end of shoots. The clusters appear 'fuzzy' from the abundance of long stamens

Fall color:

no

Fall Color Description:

Winter Foliage:

Not Found

Winter Interest:

no

Winter Interest Description:

Mature height:

2-7'

Mature spread:

3-6'

Growth rate:

Fast Growing

LANDSCAPE APPLICATION

Deer Resistant:

yes

Fire Resistant:

yes

Attracts Pollinators:

no

Attracts Butterflies:

yes

Native Habitat:

Rose spirea grows best in full sun to dappled shade and in
a wide range of soils (gravelly sandy loams to heavy
clays) that range from acidic to neutral (pH 4.5-7.5) and
from moist well drained to wet and poorly drained
(hydric). The species tolerates ext

Attracts Birds:

no

Cut/Dried Flowers:

no

Used by Wildlife:

yes

Swales:

yes

Wildlife Use:

Rose spirea provides good cover for birds and small
mammals. Grouse apparently eat the dried spikes and
other wildlife consume the seed filled capsules. The
flowers are a source of nectar for hummingbirds,
butterflies, and other pollinator insects

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Hedge/Screen:

yes

Border:

yes

Erosion Control:

no

Windbreak:

no

Ground Cover:

no

Provides Shade:

no

Rock Garden:

no

Cover Structures:

no

First Bloom:

Jun

Last Bloom:

Adds Texture/Movement:

Sep

Ornamental Accent:

yes

no

Garden Observations:

Seasonal Care
Maintenance

SEASONAL CARE

Spring Care:

Summer Care:

Fall Care:

Winter Care:

Long Term Care:

This species can become invasive, as it
spreads readily by suckers and seedlings, especially on
flat, moist to wet sites in full sun. Dense thickets can
become nearly impenetrable and too competitive for other
desirable plant species. It may not be suitab

Insect Pests:

It is host to several insect pests including aphids, leaf
rollers, and scales.

Wildlife Pests:

Diseases:

Rose spirea may be susceptible to fire blight disease
which causes dieback of tips and scorched looking leaves.

Environmental Problems:

Landscape Problems:

No serious insect or disease problems. Susceptible to fireblight, leaf spot, powdery mildew and die back. Potential insect pests include aphids and scale.

Care Comments:

Remove suckers promptly to prevent plants from spreading to form thickets.

Landscape Application
Resource Links

Plant Maintenance Information

Image by Mikaela Wiedenhoff

Sponsors
Desert Peaks Healthcare
George & Vickie Minor
Whistle Stop Farm & Flowers

McPheeter's Turf
High Desert Farms Nursery Sales, LLC
Schilling's Garden Market

Speakers
Karen McCarthy, Madras Garden Depot
Dan Denning, City of Bend
Nicole Bell, OSU Ecology Lab

Professor Amy Jo Detweiler
Craig LeHoullier
Amanda Egertson, Deschutes Land Trust
Dana Sanchez, OSU
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Renee's Garden Seeds
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