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Hollinshead Water-wise Garden Plants

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Taxon ID#

82

Large, upright, multi-stemmed shrub that can be somewhat sprawling with five-petal, tiny, pink flowers in large flattened umbel-like cymes up to 10" across; lemon-scented; good in natural settings

Scientific  Name:

Sambucus nigra 'Eva'

Common Name 1

› Black Lace Elderberry

Family:

Adoxaceae

Origins:

Europe, northern Africa, southwestern Asia

Plant Type:

Med - Lg Shrub (usually >3' and never < 1.5')
Common Name 2

Common Name 3

Oregon native:

no

Western state native:

no

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Plant Maintenance Information

Landscape Application Information

Seasonal Care

Resource Links

MAINTENANCE

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Min. USDA Hardiness Zone:

4

Sun Preference:

Full Sun

Water Preference:

M

Soil Preference:

Loamy, well-drained, moist but tolerates a wide range

Fertilizer Needs:

Actively producing mature plant: 1 cup ammonium sulfate per year; phosphorus and potassium based on soil test results

Recommended Mulch:

Apply 3 to 4 inches of an acidic mulch from the center of the plant out 4 feet

PLANT DESCRIPTION

Foliage Color:

Purple

Foliage Description:

Compound pinnate leaves with 3-7 ovate to elliptic short-stalked leaflets to 5 inches with sharply serrate margins; generally retains color throughout most of the growing season

Fragrant:

yes

Predominant flower color:

Pink

Flower Description:

Tiny five-petal flowers in showy, flattened umbel-like cymes to 10" across; lemon-scented; hermaphrodite; pollinated by flies

Fall color:

no

Fall Color Description:

Winter Foliage:

Deciduous

Winter Interest:

no

Winter Interest Description:

Mature height:

6-8'

Mature spread:

6-8'

Growth rate:

Medium

LANDSCAPE APPLICATION

Deer Resistant:

no

Fire Resistant:

yes

Attracts Pollinators:

yes

Attracts Butterflies:

yes

Native Habitat:

Parent species found in valleys, canyons, washes, slopes, seasonal drainages, and other areas where a little extra moisture is present. Sometimes found as part of wetland/riparian community, other times in more mesic portions of chaparral or woodland.

Attracts Birds:

yes

Cut/Dried Flowers:

no

Used by Wildlife:

yes

Swales:

yes

Wildlife Use:

Berries and flowers

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Hedge/Screen:

yes

Border:

yes

Erosion Control:

no

Windbreak:

no

Ground Cover:

no

Provides Shade:

no

Rock Garden:

no

Cover Structures:

no

First Bloom:

Jun

Last Bloom:

Adds Texture/Movement:

Jul

Ornamental Accent:

yes

no

Garden Observations:

Application
Anchor 1

SEASONAL CARE

Spring Care:

Prune suckers as they appear unless naturalizing is desired; remove weeds by hand

Summer Care:

Prune suckers as they appear unless naturalizing is desired; remove weeds by hand

Fall Care:

Prune suckers as they appear unless naturalizing is desired; remove weeds by hand; prune diseased, dead, damaged

Winter Care:

Prune in late winter to allow more light, improve branch structure and control size. branches and/or shoots at the base may be removed at any time.

Long Term Care:

Remove 3-year-old and older canes or cut back to the ground to rejuvenate; remove all dead, damaged or diseased canes, tip back weak canes

Insect Pests:

Borers, spider mites, aphids, leaf-cutting bee, Emerging pest: spotted-wing drosophila

Wildlife Pests:

Diseases:

Canker, powdery mildew, leaf spot

Environmental Problems:

Branches susceptible to damage from high winds or from heavy snow/ice in winter; ozone pollution

Landscape Problems:

Fruit can be messy and cause staining

Care Comments:

Elderberry produces fruit on current year growth, 1- year-old and some 2-year-old canes. Unpruned plants can rapidly become unattractive and weedy in appearance. For the best fruiting, plan to pair it with a York Elderberry, Black Beauty? or Laced Up? E

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