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Hollinshead Water-wise Garden Plants

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Taxon ID#

24

Green sword-like foliage and showy flowers in summer.

Scientific  Name:

Crocosmia x 'Lucifer'

Common Name 1

› Montbretia

Family:

Iridaceae

Origins:

Crocosmia is a genus of about 7 species of cormous plants from grasslands in South Africa. 'Lucifer' is an Alan Bloom hybrid (Crocosmia x Curtonus) which has flowers and foliage that are similar to gladiolus.

Plant Type:

Herbaceous Plant, Perennial
Common Name 2

Common Name 3

Oregon native:

no

Western state native:

no

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Plant Maintenance Information

Landscape Application Information

Seasonal Care

Resource Links

MAINTENANCE

Maintenance Level:

Medium

Min. USDA Hardiness Zone:

5

Sun Preference:

Partial Sun

Water Preference:

L

Soil Preference:

Grow in medium moisture, moderately fertile, well-drained soil

Fertilizer Needs:

Recommended Mulch:

Protect roots with a thick layer of mulch.

PLANT DESCRIPTION

Foliage Color:

Green

Foliage Description:

Narrow, sword-shaped, basal leaves

Fragrant:

no

Predominant flower color:

Red

Flower Description:

Tubular, nodding, scarlet red, one-sided flowers borne along the upper portions of stiffly arching, sometimes branched, flower scapes (stems)

Fall color:

no

Fall Color Description:

Winter Foliage:

Deciduous

Winter Interest:

no

Winter Interest Description:

Mature height:

2-3'

Mature spread:

12-24"

Growth rate:

Medium

LANDSCAPE APPLICATION

Deer Resistant:

yes

Fire Resistant:

no

Attracts Pollinators:

yes

Attracts Butterflies:

yes

Native Habitat:

Attracts Birds:

yes

Cut/Dried Flowers:

yes

Used by Wildlife:

no

Swales:

no

Wildlife Use:

Photo:
Pat Kolling

Hedge/Screen:

no

Border:

yes

Erosion Control:

no

Windbreak:

no

Ground Cover:

no

Provides Shade:

no

Rock Garden:

no

Cover Structures:

no

First Bloom:

Jul

Last Bloom:

Adds Texture/Movement:

Jul

Ornamental Accent:

yes

no

Garden Observations:

Application
Anchor 1

SEASONAL CARE

Spring Care:

Plant corms in spring after last frost date approximately 3-4" deep and 6" apart. Remove old foliage before new growth appears in early spring.

Summer Care:

Remove bloom stalks after flowers fade.

Fall Care:

Winter Care:

Not reliably winter hardy in USDA Zone 5 where it needs a protected location and winter mulch. In order to insure winter survival in USDA Zone 5 and perhaps Zone 6A, digging up the corms in fall and storing them in a dry medium over winter (in somewhat th

Long Term Care:

Divide every 3 to 4 years in early spring.

Insect Pests:

Spider mites can cause significant damage to the foliage, and, if left unchecked, can impair normal flowering.

Wildlife Pests:

Diseases:

Environmental Problems:

Landscape Problems:

Care Comments:

RESOURCES

OSU Landscape Profile:

USDA Plants:

Calscape Database:

LBJ Native Plant Database:

Missouri Botanical Garden Database:

Monrovia Profile:

Alternate Source 1:

Alternate Source 2:

Source Comment:

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